Tag Archives | food

The World Championships of Paella

Every year in the town of Sueca, Valencia, chefs from around the world square off in a tasty competition to make the best Paella Valenciana anywhere. Click below to listen or download, and don’t forget to subscribe in iTunes, Google Play, iHeartRADIO, PodBeanPlayerFM or iVoox. Scroll down for links and a few more pics.

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Jamón, The Podcast. Part One


My good friend Graham Roumieu, a very accomplished visual artist, made the above illustration for my podcast cover art. (And this one blinks every five seconds. Cool, eh?) I think it’s perfect. Funny but also elegantly simple and incisive. Thank you Graham!

In this first of a two-part series about jamón Iberico de bellota, I talk about the history of pigs and pork with author Mark Essig. If you are a fan of food and history, buy his book (see the affiliate link below). It’s impeccably researched and written in a plain, clear prose style, making it both enjoyable to read as well incredibly informative.

Get a taste of it by hitting play on the podcast link below. I hope you enjoy and thanks for listening!


New Podcast: The Spanish Food


Chorizo and manteca colorada hang in the market in Cadiz, Andalusia.

With my photo book of Spain finished, I’ve been wanting to take on a new project and I’m happy to announce that it’s already online: The Spanish Food podcast! Episode numero uno is ready to download on the iTunes store here. (If you don’t have iTunes, you can also listen on Soundcloud, or right here on my own site.)

It was an easy choice for me. I love podcasts and I love Spanish food. I’ve asked a lot of travellers to Spain how important food is to them and for most people it’s not just important, it’s everything–the central thing around which all other activities are planned!

And podcasts are such a great way to, well, consume content about Spain. You just download episodes to your phone or iPad and then you can listen whenever and wherever you want. Think of it as radio on demand. And there’s something special about listening to high-quality audio. It’s been called ‘the most visual medium’ for good reason. It transports you to another place, and the sounds and words excite the imagination like nothing else.

So please join me on this new adventure. If there’s anything in particular you would like to know more about, leave a comment below, I’d love to hear from you!

The Spanish Food

A mouthwatering new podcast from Spain. Sign Up for free updates on new episodes plus tips, recipes and more...


Mystery Thing (Solved–see Update)

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Do you know what these are? I mean, aside from delicious? Be the first to name this mystery food and win a free 8×12 print of your choosing. The answer must be the full name in Spanish or English (or latin, if you want to show off). Leave your guess in the comments section below. Good luck! Photos ©Mike Randolph

UPDATE  We have a winner, EnriqueB, author of the Spanish food blog www.dorarnosella.com. They are criadillas de tierra. That is how they are known in Extremadura, where they are most common in Spain, but they are also known as turmas in Murcia and papas crías or criadas in the Canary Islands. In English they are most commonly called desert truffles. They are related to the white truffle, though I bought mine for 12 Euros a kilo whereas white truffles are a tad more expensive–3,000 Euros a kilo. They grow in arid, sandy soils in Spain as well as parts of North Africa and the Middle East. Fungi expert Antonio Rodríguez has an excellent post on them here.

While not nearly as aromatic as white or even black truffles, they do have a wonderful mushroomy, earthy, hard-to-define taste. Some people slice them thin and use them in place of potatoes in a tortilla. But most people prefer them with scrambled eggs. They are moist, but dense, and fried in olive oil they are quite lovely. March and April is the season for fresh desert truffles, though they are also sold in jars, minus their soil-covered skin. As Julvic noted in the comments, they don’t look very appetizing. Last fun fact: Criadillas means calf’s testicles, so the rough translation for desert truffle in Spanish is calf’s testicles of the earth.

Thanks to all who participated.



Don Quixote warned his faithful companion Sancho Panza against eating garlic because his breath would betray him as a lowly farmer. But Sancho didn’t listen and neither did anybody else. (The Don was, after all, a little off his rocker.) Today, garlic is a foundation of the Mediterranean diet. In Zaragoza’s central market, above, a woman sells different varieties of garlic from across Spain. Photo ©Mike Randolph


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