Tag Archives | andalucia

Marketing 101

A 14th Century Moorish gate serves as the main entrance into Malaga’s Atarazanas market. I remember when the market used to be a lot different–rundown, a little dirty, and decidedly nose-unfriendly in places. In 2008, the market underwent a renovation that would take two years. Some Malagueños were a little nervous about how it would turn out. There was a trend around that time to change mercados from a place to buy food to a place to go for tapas. Malagueños wanted a real market, not a Disney version built for tourists.

Happily, the Mercado de Atarazanas was saved from that fate. It’s now clean, with modern stalls, a lot brighter (thanks to a transparent roof) and most important, it’s still a real market, the heartbeat of downtown Malaga.

Click on an image to expand it. Photos ©Mike Randolph

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Slippery Business at the Port

In the Mercado de Bailén, in Malaga, a fishmonger gave me the lowdown. If I wanted to see the boats unloading fish, I had to go to Caleta de Velez. In Malaga, only a few boats come in every day. The port of Malaga is too expensive, he told me, so the fishermen go to Caleta, only a short drive up the coast.

By the time I got there, many of the boats were already tied up to the dock and more were coming in; big boats, motors chugging in a throaty diesel rumble as they shifted into reverse, gunned it for a second or two, and glided gently up to the dock with unerring precision. Continue Reading →


In Spain, Life’s a Beach

It’s Sardine Week here at Spain By Mike Randolph! Discovery Channel has Shark Week, I have Sardine Week. I don’t have any video of sardines jumping out of the water to chomp down on, well, whatever it is that they eat, but how can you not get excited by the prospect of an espeto de sardinas? Okay, maybe I won’t write every single day about sardines, though I could and I really don’t think it would be too much. Let’s settle then on Chiringuito Week. It’s holiday time, summer is in full swing, and in Spain, summer is not summer without a trip to the beach, and having lunch at a chiringuito–the beachside huts that serve cold drinks and seafood–is a fundamental part of the package.

Espetos de sardinas are a specialty of Málaga. The city even has a statue to honor the espetero, the man who spears the fish onto a spit of cane, tends the fire, and brings joy to many. The smaller the sardine, the better. They’re grilled whole, and you eat them with your hands. Salty, crispy skin and rich, oily flesh. They’re not only delicious, they’re also good for you. Order the house salad, a pitcher of tinto de verano, and hunker in to enjoy.


Shade and Marmalade

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Some 14,000 orange trees decorate the streets of Seville. The bitter oranges aren’t very good for eating, but because of their high content of pectin, they do make great orange marmalade. More important, orange trees provide shade from the fierce Andalusian sun, and in the springtime, when they bloom, the heady perfume of orange blossoms fills the air. Photo ©Mike Randolph. 


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